How To Strategically Navigate The Job Market

It is no secret that marketers have a lot of options when it comes to making significant career-path choices, but this potential is not always optimized by individuals with a tendency to nitpick while hunting

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It is no secret that marketers have a lot of options when it comes to making significant career-path choices, but this potential is not always optimized by individuals with a tendency to nitpick while hunting for jobs. Indeed, many highly-skilled marketers too easily confine themselves to a handful options; prompted by a desire for specialization, they seek out positions at specific companies or within particular industries, thereby limiting the number of opportunities they may have at a given time.

 

Read also:  The road into a career in business

 

Indeed, while many companies in various industries need help filling a marketing position or similarly complex roles, too many potential applicants have already passed on their offerings in advance, because of an ingrained desire to brand themselves as being highly qualified in one particular mode of marketing. With this in mind, here are a few things to consider for market specialists in need of jobs.

Think About What You Can Do, Rather Than Where You Can Do it

While many people take on a careerist-like outlook and attempt to situate themselves as significant players in x or y industry, exclusively accounting for long-term industry goals can often skew one’s chances of a finding a position in the here-now. Indeed, these good intentions can too easily render one unemployable for large chunks of time, which can prompt hiring committees to inquire what exactly was being done during these employment gaps. Desiring to specialize your area can detrimentally impact your résumé if you seek only to work at specific companies. In this way, it’s important to aim for achievable roles, rather than catering to industry frameworks – indeed, one should know their desires without allowing them to be totalizing during the actual job hunt. If you want to work as a product manager for tech companies, but can only do so in, say, food and beverage corporations for the time being, it’s important to take on these less than ideal challenges.

Be Open-Minded

While limiting your search to a particular industry is one method of confinement, sending out applications with only one position in mind is considerably worse. There are some instances in which you may be able to work within your desired industry, but only by doing a job that does not match your trainingor career goals. Nevertheless, this is a tradeoff that can get you in the door and give you the opportunity to show off your transferable skills. In any case, you can’t possibly know if you like or dislike a job until you actually make a concerted effort to try it out. This kind of openness offers more leeway when it comes to life paths and career possibilities, to be sure.

 

Navigating the job market, indeed, isn’t always about thinking in terms of a career in itself, but rather, what’s immediately in front you as you seek to make a living and optimize your skillset; acquiring a variety of interests and abilities certainly does not taint the perceptions future employers for that dream position of yours – indeed, it will make you look good in the eyes of marketing recruiters, or even executive recruiters; you will no doubt appear all the more hirable.

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Ariana Smith is the Chief Editor for Real Wealth business. She is very passionate about marketing, small business and advertising.

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